Oxygen for reducing nausea and vomiting during emergency ambulance tansportation: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials

Erin Smith

Abstract


Objective

To determine the effectiveness of oxygen in decreasing nausea and vomiting during emergency transport.


Design

Systematic review of randomised controlled trials investigating the use of oxygen for reducing nausea and vomiting during emergency ambulance transport.


Participants

Patients with nausea and vomiting during emergency ambulance transport.


Results

Systematic review of the literature identified one trial suitable for review. The randomised controlled trial investigated the use of oxygen to reduce nausea and vomiting during emergency transport of patients with minor trauma. The trial reported that supplemental oxygen reduced nausea scores by 50% and reduced vomiting (a mean of 4 vomiting episodes in the oxygen group compared to a mean of 19 vomiting episodes in the room air group). These results are very similar to previous literature on the use of oxygen for post operative nausea and vomiting. However, the author's choice of statistical analysis compromises the quality of the trial and the significance of the results.


Conclusions

Oxygen as an intervention is inexpensive and has been successful in the treatment of perioperative and postoperative nausea and vomiting. Oxygen may be a simple method of curbing uncomfortable and potentially dangerous vomiting in patients being transported by ambulance. The use of 100% oxygen therapy in the prehospital environment for nausea, motion sickness and vomiting is worthy of further research.


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.33151/ajp.1.1.77

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The Official Journal of Paramedics Australasia © 2019                           ISSN: 2202-7270

 

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