Are healthcare professionals in Jordan willing to work and provide care for COVID-19 patients?
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Keywords

coronavirus
COVID-19
healthcare personnel
pandemics
reporting for duty

How to Cite

1.
Alwidyan M, Oteir A, Mohammad A, Williams B. Are healthcare professionals in Jordan willing to work and provide care for COVID-19 patients?. Australasian Journal of Paramedicine [Internet]. 2021Jul.22 [cited 2021Oct.19];18. Available from: https://ajp.paramedics.org/index.php/ajp/article/view/924

Abstract

Introduction

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has overwhelmed healthcare systems and exposed healthcare providers (and their families) to a high risk of infection and death. This study aimed to assess the willingness of healthcare providers in Jordan to report for duty and provide care to COVID-19 patients.

Methods

An online questionnaire was developed including questions about demographics, willingness to report to work and provide care to COVID-19 patients, and potential associated factors.

Results

A total of 253 participants completed the survey (mean age 33.8 years, 58.6% male). The sample included physicians (14.9%), nurses (61.1%) and paramedics (23%). Most participants (96.4%) were willing to come to work during the pandemic, although only 64.7% showed a willingness to provide care to COVID-19 patients. Being male (OR 3.21; 95% CI: 1.75-5.90) or having adequate training on COVID-19 (OR 5.16; 95% CI: 2.32-11.46) were the major predictors for willingness to care for COVID-19 patients, whereas concerns for family safety (OR 0.25; 95% CI: 0.14-0.47) or lack of information about COVID-19 (OR 0.43; 95% CI: 0.23-0.80) were the major predicting barriers for willingness to care for COVID-19 patients.

Conclusion

Although most participants were willing to report for duty, less than two-thirds were willing to care for COVID-19 patients. Being male and receiving training are associated with willingness; whereas concern for family is associated with less willingness to care for COVID-19 patients.

https://doi.org/10.33151/ajp.18.924
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