Maintaining asepsis in paramedicine: a Delphi study
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Keywords

Inection control
asepsis
paramedicine

How to Cite

1.
Barr N, Mason M, Clegg L, Randall F. Maintaining asepsis in paramedicine: a Delphi study: Asepsis in paramedicine. Australasian Journal of Paramedicine [Internet]. 2022Apr.13 [cited 2022May25];19. Available from: https://ajp.paramedics.org/index.php/ajp/article/view/954

Abstract

Background

Paramedic clinical care often includes procedures that breach the body’s natural defences. Despite the complexity of these procedures asepsis is a clinical goal for all invasive procedures. In doing so, it is critical that ‘key-parts’ and ‘key-sites’ are protected to decrease the risk of transmitting healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Although a national framework in Australia for the prevention and control of infection in healthcare exists, this advice needs adapting to the field of paramedicine to account for variation in practice setting and clinical practice. This project aimed to reach consensus among experts regarding how to maintain asepsis in paramedic practice.

Method

A modified Delphi process was used with four iterative online rounds. Participants were sought nationally using a snowball (bias) technique and included professionals within healthcare who met the inclusion criteria of extensive experience in one or more of three areas: paramedicine, infection prevention and control, and evidence-based policy development.

Results

A consensus statement regarding how to maintain asepsis in paramedic practice was developed.

Conclusion

This project provides a consensus statement that will allow operational procedures to be reviewed, techniques specific to paramedic practice to be developed and implemented, and scientific research to be conducted.

https://doi.org/10.33151/ajp.19.954
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